On October 4th-7th, Footstool Mission Center will be hosting a Church Planting Essentials training for anyone that has any interest in church planting. The training will be lead by Dynamic Church Planting International (DCPI), an organization born out of the desire to see church planters thrive in fulfilling their God-given calling. The DCPI vision is to equip leaders to plant five million dynamic churches to reach the world for Christ. Dr. Paul Becker, Founder and President of DCPI, cast this vision in 2010. Since then, they have spread their vision to over 110 countries and have trained over 118,000 church planting leaders.

DCPI teaches THE BOSS PRINCIPLE: Christ is the Lord of church planting and He has a vision for the new church plant. This is based on Ephesians 1:22-23: “And God placed all things under his feet and appointed him to be head over everything for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills everything in every way.” Along with their strategy of establishing national partnerships, training and equip leaders, planting reproducing leaders, and multiplying the movement, only .01% of churches planted with the DCPI methodology fail (according to a study by The Barna Group). With such a high emphasis on multiplication, DCPI seeks to plant +323,000 churches in the next five years.

“The single most effective evangelistic methodology under heaven is planting new churches,” Peter Wagner, former professor of Church Growth at Fuller Theological Seminary.

 

Church planting is a strategic way to attract unchurched people, as new church plants tend to focus more on outreach and are more sensitive to issues outside their four walls. This provides an opportunity to disciple new believers and reach different demographics of people by strategically positioning ministries that serve the community in fresh and effective ways. Church planting also provides an opportunity for the church to bring reconciliation and healing to a hurting community.

Church plants are a great way to renew existing churches. Oftentimes, older congregations are reluctant to try new approaches because they have become comfortable doing things the way they have always done them. New churches have to be innovative, creative, and operate mostly in new ways. There is room to experiment, learn from mistakes, and grow together in their new community. New churches also provide an opportunity for believers to grow in leadership as new positions open up within the church.

If you are interested in church planting or are considering a church plant, this training is for you!

 




 

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